We have all been there – sitting at a computer trying to find a file, download something, install something, or any manner of computer related things, only to have the whole endeavor fail miserably resulting in frustration and quite possibly tears. The end result is abandoning the task and vowing to live the paleo lifestyle in every sense of the word – no more electricity for me! Caves look really comfortable anyway!

Some people really love technology; especially new technology. They don’t often experience the above scenario and seem to have an innate ability to understand circuits and programs. They’re all over smart tech like ph360 and Shae. They have every gadget known to man and are the first in line whenever a new one is invented. I am not one of these people.

On the complete opposite end of the scale are the traditionalists. These people have a deep dislike, if not hatred, of anything to do with computers and technology. They don’t see a need for any of it and if they have a cell phone it’s likely to be a Nokia 3310 – which remains switched off most of the time anyway. And, no they probably don’t play snake on it. I am not one of these people either.

I lump myself somewhere in the middle – a place where, I suspect, most people would fall on this spectrum. I don’t know a whole lot about computers but I use one almost daily. I’m not wild for all the new gadgets but occasionally one comes along that makes my life a little easier. I’m not by any stretch a techie but I understand the importance and value of technology and innovation, not just for my personal life, but for the advancement of society.

Take for example the washing machine. It’s something most of take for granted these days, but before washing machines were invented, someone had to do it all by hand – usually this someone was a woman. It took up an enormous amount of time and it was physically demanding. When the washing machine came onto the scene all the scepticism and concern that we see with new tech today was raised: ‘Do we really need it? The old way has worked fine so far. It won’t do as good a job. What will women do with their time and energy now?’ Well those women read books, went out, suddenly had more time to contribute to society in other ways. The humble washing machine was a major driver of social change.

Most technology that sticks around is. Technology is the ultimate embodiment of human advancement – it fuels and is fueled by it. Yes new technology can be overwhelming, hard to adjust to, hard to understand and it is incredibly fast changing and evolving so it’s hard to keep up with. But it is a positive thing and, as in the above example, can be very powerful.

Take our current approach to health, for instance. Most of us do our best to follow the sometimes contradictory advice that we hear from the government and the media while checking in with our doctor when we are unwell. Considering that each and every one of us is completely unique due to our genes and environment, it’s no surprise that this one-size-fits-all approach is lacking.

Wouldn’t it be amazing if we had the technology to recognize our individual needs? Something to tell us exactly which foods to eat and which to avoid. Something to tell us which exercise is best for us and when is the the optimal time to do it. Something that knows we have a sensitivity to pollen so it will suggest indoor activities to avoid hayfever on a day with a high pollen count. Something that measures our stress levels and knows just the right time to remind us to have some ‘me time’. Something that knows how much sleep we need and the optimal time to get it. Something that just ‘gets’ us.

As is often the case with technology, it’s far more advanced than we realize. What I just described above, an intuitive, interactive, smart personal health assistant already exists. Shae is the evolution of ph360 – a completely personalized approach to health, wellness and prevention. This is one of those examples of incredibly advanced tech that is not intimidating but could just be life changing.